What is your program model? What degree do you award?
Answer:
Ours is a scientist/practitioner model. We award a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology.
How long is your program?
Answer:
It is a five year (4+1) program. The first two years are largely didactic, although students become involved in practica and research (including a master’s thesis or second year research project).The third year is an advanced clinical training year with fewer academic courses, but continued research involvement and planning for a dissertation project. The fourth year emphasizes the completion and defense of the dissertation and refinement of clinical skills before internship. The fifth year is a full-time, year-long clinical internship, required for degree completion.
Is a master's degree required for admission?
Answer:
No. A master's degree is not required. However, a substantial background in psychology is required. Approximately 24-30 undergraduate credit hours in psychology including statistics and research methods constitutes a substantial background.
My major was not in psychology. Can I still apply?
Answer:
Applicants from related disciplines are welcome to apply. However, because psychology has its own science base, approximately 24-30 undergraduate credit hours in psychology is generally recommended and constitutes a suitable background in the field. Psychological statistics and research methods are expected, as well as clinically relevant courses such as developmental psychology, abnormal psychology, personality, and tests and measurement. Experience in clinical work (practicum, volunteer, or paid) and research are also necessary to be competitive for admission.
What if I already have a master's degree?
Answer:
Every semester includes prerequisites for the next. Students with master's degrees may be permitted to waive individual courses, but that usually does not result in shortening the length of the program, just lightening the course load. Admitted students may submit a request to waive non-clinical courses although this is not guaranteed.
Can I attend part time?
Answer:
No, because each semester includes prerequisites for the next, and because there is a seven year limit for the degree, part time study is not practical.
Where are classes taught?
Answer:
Classes are taught on the main campuses at Eastern Virginia Medical School, (EVMS); Norfolk, State University (NSU), and Old Dominion University (ODU) and occasionally at a satellite education center.
What minimum GRE scores do you require? What about the subject test?
Answer:
Applications are evaluated in their entirety, and GRE scores are one component of the overall application. The psychology subject test is not required but may provide useful information if your major was not in psychology.
Is an interview required?
Answer:
Yes, an in-person interview is required, and interview dates will be scheduled for January and February. Offers will be made only to applicants who interview.
How will I hear about the status of my application?
Answer:
You can easily check online at: http://odu.edu/admission/graduate/status where you can learn if your application is complete. Applicants who are invited to interview are notified by phone and/or email. Those who are not selected to interview will be notified by mail in addition to being able to check their admission status at http://odu.edu/admission/graduate/status. Interview invitations will be extended in January.
How many applicants are invited to interview? How many offers are made?
Answer:
Depending on the strength of the applicant pool, about 30 applicants are invited to interview each year. After interviews some of those may be released. From among those remaining, we admit a class of approximately 6 students.
When are offers made?
Answer:
After interviews are completed, faculty research mentors and the Admission Committee make decisions regarding admission offers. Our goal is to make offers as soon as possible, usually within two weeks.
How are candidates and alternates notified?
Answer:
Offers of admission are made by phone and confirmed in writing. There is a short list of alternates, who also are notified by phone. Some applicants may be released after interviews; those applicants are notified in writing.
What about financial aid offers?
Answer:
Financial aid offers are often made with offers of admission and will be confirmed in writing. If you receive an offer, ask any and all questions you have about financial aid at that time.
If I do receive an offer, how much time will I have to make my decision?
Answer:
The Virginia Consortium supports the resolution adopted by the Council of University Directors of Clinical Psychology (CUDCP) and follows their guidelines for admissions offers and acceptance: "Offers are usually made in writing prior to April 1" and "Regardless of when the offer is made, students are not required to respond to the offer before the decision date of April 15..." A decision to accept must also be made in writing.
I may receive other offers. What am I expected to do?
Answer:
It is likely to be a busy time. A successful strategy for handling competing pressures is to review your offers weekly, to decide between or among them, and release those in which you are no longer interested. It is wise to keep no more than one offer at a time. Prioritize your options as soon as you have completed your interviews, and rank them. Then if you receive an offer from your 4th ranked program, notify the programs you've ranked below 4 (e.g., 5, 6 etc.) that you are withdrawing. Release the offer from program number 4 when you get an offer from number 3 and so on. The CUDCP policy encourages applicants not to hold more than two offers for more than one week unless there is specific information that has not yet been received from one of the programs that is necessary to make a decision.
You say "prioritize your options." How can I do that?
Answer:
In the best of all possible worlds, your training goals would be your single most important consideration. In reality, other factors can limit your range of choices. We understand you must weigh issues such as is the length of the program, cost, and location, among other factors.
If I want to accept an offer, what then?
Answer:
If you find yourself considering an offer from our program, know that we are always available to discuss its merits or to answer questions. However, if you decide to accept another offer or to withdraw your application to the Virginia Consortium for any reason, we ask you to phone or e-mail us as soon as you have made that decision. Often other applicants will be waiting on your decision.